According to a recent study on physician burnout posted by American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, about half of all PM&R physicians met the definition of burnout, and two-thirds reported becoming more callous toward patients.

Physiatrists partner with IRC more than any other PM&R group because we help prevent physician burnout! By taking care of the business side of practicing, it allows our Physiatrists to focus on patient care, balance their work with life and generate top tier income.

Read the study below. If you’re feeling PM&R burnout, contact us today, maybe a career change with IRC is just what you need!

Original article can be found here: https://www.abpmr.org/NewsCenter/Detail/published-burnout-diplomates-survey?fbclid=IwAR1PhImMHLnxRHy7UlZ1cew7ht66vCWRihH-ETe-B5J5SiAtRp_WNm0JWvM

MARCH 15, 2019 – RESEARCH

Published: Burnout in Diplomates of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation–Prevalence and Potential Drivers: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Survey

Summary by James A Sliwa DO

Physician burnout has become a topic of growing concern over the last several years. This is especially true for PM&R, which consistently ranks as one of the most “burned out” medical specialties. This study surveyed 8,825 American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation diplomates to determine the prevalence and potential drivers of burnout in PM&R. The survey consisted of demographic and practice information, the Mini-Z Burnout Survey, one question from the Maslach Burnout Scale on callousness towards patients, and several questions regarding potential drivers of burnout in physician practice.

We received 1,536 surveys back for a response rate of 17.4%. Of these, 770 (50.7%) met the definition of burnout. Only 38% of physiatrists reported not becoming more callous towards patients. The three reasons most commonly cited as causes of burnout by physiatrists were:

  • increasing regulatory demands,
  • work load and job demands, and
  • practice inefficiency and lack of resources.

Higher burnout rates were associated with high reported levels of job stress and working more hours per week. There was no significant association between burnout and sex, years in practice, practice focus, or practice area.

We concluded that burnout is a significant problem among PM&R physicians and appears to be pervasive throughout the specialty. Opportunities to address major contributors of burnout for PM&R physicians do exist and are to some degree under the control of practitioners, hospital leaders and administrators.

Click on the link below to read the abstract or download the full article.

Burnout in Diplomates of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation–Prevalence and Potential Drivers: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Survey

Sliwa JA, Clark GS, Chiodo A, Kinney CL, Raddatz MM, Francisco GE, Micheo W, Robinson LR. Burnout in diplomates of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation–prevalence and potential drivers: a prospective cross-sectional survey. PM&R. 2019;11(1):83-89. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2018.07.013